Ohio Agricultural Law Blog -- What We’ve Been Up To: Examining the Different State Approaches to CAUV

Wednesday, March 13th, 2019
Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Agricultural and Resource Law Program

When we are not on the road presenting, in the classroom teaching, or keeping up with the news for the blog, our team is busy working on large scale research projects for the Agricultural & Food Law Consortium.  One of our recent projects looked at how states assess farmland for property tax purposes, and we then created a compilation of every state’s laws on this topic.  Based upon the research, we found that property taxes are a fact of life for virtually all landowners in the United States, but that each state uses a “differential tax assessment” for agricultural lands.

What exactly is a differential tax assessment?  Many Ohio farmers know about and use Ohio’s special property tax assessment known as CAUV, which is short for Current Agricultural Use Valuation.  Instead of assessing property taxes on the basis of the market rate for developable land, CAUV uses a different formula that assesses the land on its value for agricultural production.  CAUV is a form of differential tax assessment.

While each state utilizes differential tax assessments for agricultural lands, they use different definitions of agriculture, different formulas, and different application processes.  Some areas of law utilize model acts that states may adopt in order to make it easier to do business across state lines.  Differential tax assessments of agricultural land do not have a model act, so each state’s language reflects the culture, norms, and conditions of the respective state at the time the state adopted or amended its differential tax assessment.

An example close to home illustrates what this means.  Under Ohio Revised Code § 5713.30(A), agricultural use means commercial animal or poultry husbandry, aquaculture, algaculture, apiculture, the commercial production of field crops, tobacco, fruits, vegetables, nursery stock, ornamental trees, and sod.  Commercial timber qualifies, but non-commercial timber only qualifies if it located on or next to land that otherwise would qualify for CAUV.  Exclusive use requires just that: the land is exclusively used for an activity listed as an agricultural use.  Lands of more than 10 acres that are exclusively devoted to agricultural uses qualify, but lands of less than 10 acres only qualify if the average yearly gross income exceeds $2,500 over the preceding three years.  That is an example of a definition of what qualifies as agriculture for the purposes of the differential tax assessment.

The differential tax assessment project compiled the approaches taken by all fifty states, and the compilations are available on the National Agricultural Law Center website HERE.  This material is based upon work supported by the National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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