2020 Legislation Becoming Effective in 2021 and Beyond

By:Jeffrey K. Lewis, Attorney and Research Specialist, Agricultural & Resource Law Monday, February 01st, 2021
Ohio Statehouse during a clear day.

As disruptive as 2020 was, the Ohio General Assembly persisted in working for Ohio citizens. On our blog we have been providing you with some in-depth analysis on key legislation passed by the previous General Assembly. Below you will find brief summaries on additional pieces of legislation passed by the Ohio Legislature in 2020. 

House Bill 24 – Revising Humane Society Law

H.B. 24 seeks to improve accountability for humane societies and other organizations throughout the state – this includes: (1) requiring each county humane society to submit an annual report of enforcement activities to the county sheriff; (2) making records of an enforcement activity by a humane society agent a public record; (3) prohibiting a humane society from entering into an agreement not to prosecute unless a judge has reviewed and approved the agreement; (4) specifying the removal procedures of a humane society agent from office; and (5) asserting that a humane society agent is a public servant for the purposes of bribery law and therefore a humane society agent is subject to criminal prosecution for bribery. 

H.B. 24 also expands the current law governing the seizure and impoundment of companion animals. Under H.B. 24, any animal can be seized and impounded when related to a violation of an animal cruelty law. However, written notice is required within 24 hours after the animal is seized and impounded. 

Governor DeWine signed H.B. 24 into law on December 29, 2020 and it becomes effective on March 31, 2021. 

House Bill 33 – Establishing Animal Abuse Reporting Requirements

H.B. 33 adds dog wardens, deputy dog wardens, or other persons appointed to act as an animal control officer to the list of professionals who must immediately report child abuse to a public services agency or peace officer. 

H.B. 33 requires veterinarians and specified social service or counseling professionals to report abuse of a companion animal to a law enforcement officer, humane society agent, or other animal control-type professional. Law enforcement, humane society agents, and animal control-type professionals must report abuse of a companion animal, under certain circumstances, to the appropriate social service professional. Lastly, H.B. 33 grants immunity to those required to make an animal abuse report, from criminal or civil actions, so long as the report was made in good faith. 

H.B. 33 goes into effect on April 12, 2021.  

House Bill 67 – Veterinarian Student Debt Assistance Program  

H.B. 67 creates a Veterinarian Student Debt Assistance Program which allows the State Veterinary Medical Licensing Board to agree to repay all or part of any educational loans taken out by a veterinarian while in veterinary college. Veterinarians must apply for the program and perform 12 or more hours of charitable veterinary services to be eligible. H.B. 67 goes into effect on April 12, 2021.

Senate Bill 21 – Benefit Corporations

S.B. 21 allows certain corporations to become benefit corporations. A benefit corporation is a corporation that includes a beneficial purpose in the corporation’s articles of incorporation. Under the new law, a beneficial purpose is defined as a “purpose to have a bona fide positive effect, or to reduce one or more bona fide negative effects, of an artistic, charitable, cultural, economic, educational, environmental, literary, medical, religious, scientific, or technological nature for the benefit of persons, entities, communities, or interests aside from shareholders.” A benefit corporation is still allowed to operate for other purposes that help make the corporation profitable and neither the beneficial purpose nor any other purpose of the corporation has priority over the other.  Under the law, once a benefit corporation is established, the corporation is allowed to use “benefit” or “b-“ as a prefix. Examples of popular benefit corporations include Patagonia, Seventh Generation, TOMS, and Ben & Jerry’s. 

S.B. 21 goes into effect March 24, 2021. 

Senate Bill 276 – Updated Limited Liability Company Laws

S.B. 276 enacts the Ohio Revised Limited Liability Company Act (ORLLCA) and makes some major updates to Ohio’s LLC laws. While the Bill is expansive, the following are two major highlights from the legislation. 

Under current law, an Ohio LLC may be managed by its members or by a manager. In different scenarios, the authority to bind the LLC by a member or manager may vary. The ORLLCA does away with the member/manager distinction and provides that a person’s authority to bind the LLC must be determined by referencing the operating agreement, decisions of the members in accordance with the operating agreement, or by the default rules laid out in the ORLLCA.  

Another major change includes the creation of the series LLC. A series LLC consists of a “parent” LLC and separate subdivisions (or series). Under the ORLLCA, a “parent” LLC’s operating agreement may provide for the establishment of one or more designated series that has at least one member associated with each series and either (or both) of the following: (1) separate rights, powers, or duties with respect to each series; and/or (2) a separate purpose or investment objective. 

Under the ORLLCA, the debts, obligations, liabilities of a series do not jeopardize the assets held by the “parent” LLC or any other series. However, this limitation only applies if: (1) the records maintained for that series account for the assets of that series separately from any other assets of the “parent” LLC or other series; (2) the “parent” LLC’s operating agreement contains a statement to the effect of the limitation; and (3) the “parent” LLC’s articles of organization contain a statement that the LLC may have one or more series of assets subject to this limitation. So long as the records of the series are maintained in a manner that the assets of the series can be reasonably identified, the protection is likely to apply. 

The ORLLCA is set to take effect January 1, 2022.